The Pulse of Natural Health Newsletter

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Natural Thyroid Medications at Risk

77

Why is the government targeting them? Together let’s put a stop to this. Action Alerts!

Last summer, we told you that Hillary Clinton was prescribed Coumadin, a dangerous blood thinner with lots of nasty side effects. We also noted that she was prescribed Armour Thyroid, a natural medicine, to treat an underactive thyroid gland.

Now, however, the government is waging a vendetta against Armour Thyroid, because it is natural, and instead is promoting incomplete and synthetic thyroid medications. In addition, if the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) goes through with recent proposals, thousands of patients with similar thyroid conditions may lose access to the compounded version of natural thyroid medications they rely upon to treat their hypothyroidism.

An estimated 20 million Americans have some form of thyroid disease, which many experts believe to be a very understated figure, given how often it is not properly diagnosed. One woman in eight will develop a thyroid condition during her lifetime. So will many men. One of the most common thyroid disorders is hypothyroidism, where the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone, causing symptoms such as extreme fatigue, depression, weight gain, and forgetfulness.

Patients with hypothyroidism need medicine that will supplement the body with sufficient thyroid hormone. The human body produces five different thyroid hormones, though today most patients are treated with a synthetic product produced by Big Pharma that contains only one of the hormones, thyroxine, also called T4, which is not even the hormone that the human body actually uses. To be of any help, the T4 must be converted to another hormone, and many of us cannot do this efficiently.

We’ve reported previously that a clinical trial found that hypothyroid patients prefer natural, desiccated thyroid extract, or DTE, to T4-only preparations. This is likely due to the fact that pig thyroid glands (from which DTE is typically derived) produce T1, T2, T3, T4, and calcitonin. Not only do many patients prefer natural thyroid—it’s also cheaper. List prices for synthetic thyroid run around $40 for 30 tablets (100mcg), whereas Armour goes for around $20 for 30 tablets (60mg). (Generally speaking, 100mcg of Synthroid is equivalent to 60mg of Armour.)

Mainstream medicine preaches that it is sufficient to supplement only with T4; that the body will convert an appropriate amount of T4 into T3; and that T1, T2 and calcitonin aren’t needed. While this may be true for some hypothyroid patients, clearly there are many others who get better only when they take DTE. An ANH-USA staff member, for instance, must supplement with compounded time-released T3, which is only available as a compounded drug. As you know from our other articles, the future of all compounded medicine is now in doubt. The problem appears to be that the FDA regards compounding as a competitor to FDA-approved drugs and therefore something to put out of business.

As you might guess, patient preference for natural thyroid medications—which are often compounded and delivered via time release—did not come as welcome news to Big Pharma. In a list of the top 100 most prescribed, top selling drugs in 2015, Synthroid was the number one most prescribed drug, bringing in $1,022,330,738 in sales. Natural thyroid, and the compounding pharmacies that produce it, therefore represent an annoyance to the government-sponsored monopolists running Big Pharma.

Some evidence that the pharmaceutical industry was moving against natural thyroid emerged seven years ago. In 2009, thyroid patients on DTE were thrown for a loop when the two major makers of DTE—Armour and Nature-throid—both experienced mysterious shortages and could not meet demand at the same moment. Many patients spent hours on the phone, calling pharmacy after pharmacy to find a source of DTE. Fortunately, compounding pharmacies were able to fill in, as they can make DTE in any dose, using the same raw materials as Armour and Nature-throid (albeit at a higher price).

The next shoe to drop was the attack on compounding pharmacies. Now Medicare has dropped coverage of Armour Thyroid in favor of Big Pharma’s synthetic thyroid drugs. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) concluded that Armour Thyroid posed a higher risk to patients, recommending instead Big Pharma’s “safer alternatives.” This will take a big chunk out of Armour’s revenue. Any physician prescribing Armour to a Medicare patient would put his or her license at risk. Of course, insurance companies tend to follow in Medicare’s wake, if only because they administer Medicare and find it convenient to run one system.

The bottom line: patients will have fewer options, worse outcomes, and medical costs will go up. The only winners are the big drug companies and their allies at the FDA.

Hypothyroid patients are just one of the many, many types of patients who will lose access to medicines they rely upon—if the FDA is successful in eliminating compounding. In the coming weeks we will be telling you much more about what else is at stake.

TWO Action Alerts!

(1) Write to the FDA and tell them to maintain access to compounded thyroid medications.

Take-Action

(2) Send a message to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and protest their dropping of Armour Thyroid. Please send your messages immediately!

Take-Action

 

Other articles in this week’s Pulse of Natural Health:

Borax Being Added to Vaccines

Senate DARK Act Defeated!

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  • lp

    I take Synthroid daily, since I had thyroid cancer and my thyroid gland was removed 17 years ago. My thyroid levels are normal and my body converts the synthetic version fine. I am tested every 6 months, with tests that check various aspects of my thyroid. I also want to dispute what you mention is the cost of Synthroid.
    I pay $10 for 100 pills, which last me 100 days. Even without insurance it would be $30, so not sure where you get your astronomical figures from! My daughter-in-law, on the other hand, takes Armour and pays substantially more than I and is constantly having a hard time regulating her thyroid levels!! With my not having a thyroid gland, maintaining levels is extremely important for my health and the reoccurrence of Thyroid cancer.
    One more HUGE point I want to make is that Armour is made from PIGS! Some of us do not eat meat nor do we want a pig to die for their medication when there are good substitutes. I would think you would be sensitive to that. I just want to say that I am not a big fan of Big Pharma for many reasons, but I think the truth on this subject is important. I also think people would appreciate my comments as well, before they make a decision of such importance.

    • Jess Thinkin

      Be interested to see how long your post stays up on this thread. I’m not a ‘Big Pharma’ sycophant either, so I’m approaching this article from a decidedly neutral standpoint! The longer (… say…. permanent?) your comment remains, the better I’ll view ANH USA

      • lp

        Very true. I just wanted to give my actual experience with the drug as well as my thoughts, rather than what is being fed to us by “professionals”. The thing that upset me was their huge cost difference from what I actually pay for the synthetic. My circumstances are vastly different and much more critical since I have NO thyroid, rather than just having slightly low levels that most people experience. People are free to make their own choices, but they need to do research from multiple sources before making an informed decision.

        • Mike G

          The problem here is that there is an effort to keep people from making their own choices. Hopefully, if there are factual inaccuracies in the article, ANH will fix them. However, the natural version should not be made unavailable, which is the point of the article.

        • Rick

          Again, there are a plethora of factors that go into pricing, cost, reimbursement, co-pays, deductibles, you name it. I wouldn’t get hung up on cost, as I mentioned above, the costs in AWP are much the same for similar doses. Do you know if you are paying AWP, WAC, a blended formula? Maybe your pharmacy doesn’t mark up as much? Are your insurance plans deductibles similar? Do you know if the PBM that serves your insurance plans are getting the best price from their manufacturer or wholesaler? Are there rebates involved. Bottom line: when the general public (patients) talk comparative pricing on meds, they are rarely talking apples to apples. This is one thing that needs to be fixed, very complex, and very confusing.

          • thatgirlinnewyork

            Thank you for saying that about pricing–this isn’t a simple “one molecule versus another vis a vis price” situation. Formularies and pricing are as varied as patients themselves.

        • thatgirlinnewyork

          You believe you are “more critical;” but people take thyroid medications for a range of severities; and they respond to the range of those available in an equally complex manner. Judging everyone else as “just having slightly low levels” is silly, broad brushing and flirts with bullying.

          • lp

            Bullying? You know you have some serious mental problems, right? Do you also hear voices?

          • phoenix23002

            lp.. you are so arrogant and condescending. We are all just struggling to get and stay healthy no matter what it takes. The FDA seems more determined to turn our whole medical industry into managing disease rather than curing disease. We should all be on the same page in keeping all our options open and available.

          • Squirrgrrl721

            No thyroid gland = no thyroid hormone = more ‘critical’ (for lack of a better term). Seems pretty logical to me. On a range from 0-10 (zero being the most critical or severely affected, ten being fully functioning) that would be a 0, right?
            How is that bullying?

          • Squirrgrrl721

            People who have no thyroid glands can go comatose without treatment. I don’t think hypothyroid folks have to worry about that. Correct me if I’m wrong.

          • offkey

            Hypothyroid people can go into a myxedema coma and die also. Most don’t, but it can happen.

    • Lana Reich

      To each his own. I am happily on Nature-throid. Everyone of us deserve the freedom of choice and not have to be forced into taking ANY medications that we don’t want to just because an industry made our first choices unavailable. I am TIRED of industries and the government “sheeple-ing” the American population for profit.

      • lp

        Yes you are. I was just curious, for one, why they would exaggerate the price so much, considering I pay substantially less. Just seemed odd to me since cost is such a crucial thing that people use to make decisions on their drug choices. I am also a vegetarian and in no way going to kill a pig for a medicine that I do not need. That would hardly constitute someone to be a “sheeple”. You should stop being so angry about someone else’s honest opinion, based on their 17 years of personal experience. Are you sure your thyroid levels are normal? Agitation is a sign of abnormal thyroid levels. Good luck to you.

        • thatgirlinnewyork

          What a horrible, bullying comment.

          • lp

            Wow, really? I have no thyroid! Excuse me for stating that fact. I guess I shouldn’t mention it so people don’t understand the possible difference in treatment? You are angry over nothing, aren’t you? So silly! I have no time for angry people like you and will not respond to your hostility again! Have a great life.

          • thatgirlinnewyork

            Ooh–maybe I was wrong. You win on complete and justified misery, over everyone here!

            Unfortunately, that won’t make you any happier–or keep you from typing with screaming caps and many exclamation points.

          • phoenix23002

            And just what do you think packing houses do with the thyroid gland that is left over after a hog is butchered for bacon, hams and pork chops? Have you seen pork thyroid glands on sale at your local grocery store? They would be thrown away if not for them being put to use to help folks with underactive or non-existent thyroid glands. So… that hog isn’t being butchered just for it’s thyroid gland. You are certainly entitled to your opinion… just not your own facts when they are erroneous.

          • lp

            You can do what you please, but I don’t eat bacon and would not put in my body for any other reason as well. Like I said, do what you please, that is what I prefer. I wouldn’t eat my dog either, but they eat them in China and Thailand, and pigs are smarter than dogs. Just my choice and that is what I prefer not to do. I live my life, you live your’s. You do what you have to do.

          • phoenix23002

            I didn’t say a word about you eating pork.. right? Your preference, your choice; knock yourself out, but lots of folks do eat pork. This wasn’t a diatribe about you eating or not eating pork. It was about your remark that a hog was being killed just for it’s thyroid gland. as if it was being sacrificed just for your needs. That is wrong… wrong.. wrong. and not the case at all.

          • Maranatha2011

            How right you are! I, for one, love bacon,(naturally cured, of course.) Animals were created for us, by God, for our use and pleasure. Everything He made is good. This doesn’t mean we must like everything, or get bent out of shape when someone else does(or doesn’t.) Some people just need to gripe about everything.

          • phoenix23002

            Agree, Maranatha2011. The only admonition in the Bible is for us to be good stewards. We have raised animals, owned horses and other livestock for years and I wish I had it so good…lol. We domesticate animals and make them dependent on us so we have an obligation and responsibility to treat them humanely in all instances.

          • Maranatha2011

            Absolutely! I find it noteworthy that in these days of excess, we see extremes of everything. We see people whose cruelty leaves us shocked & heartbroken: and we see people who love & regard animals as more valuable than humans. A sure sign of the times….

          • Squirrgrrl721

            I’m pretty sure it was a figure of speech- not that she actually thinks the hog is killed just for its thyroid gland. Why are we so hyperfocused on this? The point she was trying to make was that she has reasons for not taking armour thyroid- she stated those reasons and defended herself because she felt she was being judged as a “sheep” for her choice.
            Seriously can we stay focused?

          • phoenix23002

            Well, gee… lp referenced the fact that she doesn’t eat pork in practically every one of her posts. We got it. I have read of lots of folks who are vegetarians or who don’t eat pork for whatever reason and I can’t recall any of them getting on their soapbox about not eating meat and the poor hogs being butchered. We got it. So, who was being hyperfocused?
            I thought Lana’s comment was very reasoned and didn’t accuse lp of being a sheep at all but boy did lp come back at her with both barrels… accusing her of being angry? Huh? How was Lana angry at all?

        • offkey

          Your experience is just that, YOUR experience. I tried synthetics and they just don’t work for me. I respect that you are a vegetarian, but I’m not.

      • GramE

        I’ve been on Armour Thyroid for some time. I was on it some years ago. That doctor retired, thus new doctor. She put me on something else – six months later I asked her to please put me back on Armour Thyroid. I became much better again. I will be quite distressed if I lose this again. As a senior, I am checked regularly for many values. Remember folks, what works for one doesn’t necessarily work for another. And to lp – that charming pig is going to be used for many other things.

        • Janie Bowthorpe

          There are other brands of NDT, GramE.

          • GramE

            I’ll look into that Janie.

    • Rick

      I happen to be a Phamacy Dr. By training who works for a big PhRMA company, and find it hard to believe why we do not or cannot have choice in this issue. I respect your position on the pork thing, but if we can have “choice” on killing our babies, why not on two different types of medicines that treat the same disease? My wife had been on levothyroxine when she was first diagnosed, and couldn’t find the right dose to alleviate her symptoms, her T4 wasn’t being converted to T3 for whatever reason. So in switching to a product that delivers 4 types of thyroid hormone and calcitonin, she had significant improvements. She also had aluminum Heaven metal toxicity, and in looking at the suspect ingredients in her synthetic med Levo… Of course one of the excipient ingredients was aluminum lake in the color dyes they use. They also throw in GMO corn starch for good measure. As far as cost goes, at the store I work at some weekends, our price is roughly the same. Certainly nothing to quarrel over. So rather than take sides against each other in this divide and conquer nation we’ve lived in over the last 15 years, we should be banding together to demand choice in this case. Big problem is our conventionally trained PhRMA funded docs know very little about nutrition and integrative medicine these days.

      • lp

        I respect your wife’s choice. People need to know the options to make their own decision. The more information the better. I also think there is a difference between total removal of a thyroid and having a thyroid that deficient in producing the thyroid hormone. I just wanted to give my opinion and point out the discrepancies since I have been dealing with this for 17 years. People can take away what they want from it or nothing at all. Best of luck to you and your wife!

      • Nancy Keeler

        Well said!

      • thatgirlinnewyork

        Very well put. Unfortunately, pricing is oft decided by managed care formularies, rather than the pharmacies themselves (though everyone, including those managed care orgs, argues that chain pharmacies’ buying power affords “better pricing.” But that savings goes to the insurer–not the insured, who usually shoulder some portion of the cost for drugs like these). Given that everyone comes from a different insurance pool, decided by the volume of their employer (save for ACA plans), it’s reasonable to expect that employees of smaller companies will pay more than those from large ones.

        I received a letter from my insurer in February saying, simply, that Armour Thyroid would no longer be on my formulary, and that synthroid would be “substituted.” My doctor has heard this from a spate of patients, and is determined to push back via DAW/DNS and letters to our managed care companies. Time will tell whether she prevails!

      • flowwalker

        Appreciate your reply. Many people have significant trouble with the synthetic Synthroid. While I was at the Post Office the other day, there were four people right after me in line who all had trouble with Synthroid. They were glad to hear about Armour. Most people have no side effects with Armour. Unfortunately, if you look at the list of possible side effects for Synthroid, it is very long, and some of the possible side effects are dangerous — such as thickening of the heart wall and bone loss — and many of these side effects could harm people behind the scenes for years before being discovered. I do hope that access to Armour Thyroid can be maintained. My insurance company dropped coverage for it some two or three years ago, but I will gladly pay the whole cost so long as I can. My cost is certainly higher than the article quotes, but now I see why the cost keeps going up. I had thought it was just another instance of corporate greed!

      • phoenix23002

        Well said, Rick.

      • Terry

        You wrote: “Big problem is our conventionally trained PhRMA funded docs know very little about nutrition and integrative medicine these days.”

        Unfortunately, it’s not just “these days” regular docs “know very little about nutrition and integrative medicine” it’s been going on for many decades (just read thru the article “What Are Nutritional Supplements? Information You MUST Know!” if you google it).

        So it has long been a “Big problem” as you correctly stated… a big unacknowledged ignored problem really.

    • Wendy Allen

      Cancer can be due to gluten which can also hurt the thyroid and the rest of the body/brain if gluten is not stopped. Amour has T3/T2/T1/calcitonin which may help. Synthroid may have gluten in it.

      • lp

        Thyroid cancer is different than most cancers. My thyroid cancer was most likely due to radiation exposure, which is most thyroid cancer, according to research and talking with professionals. That is why the thyroid cancer rates in Fukushima and Chernobyl are high. Especially if you are exposed while young. That is why they now cover your thyroid when doing dental x-rays. Hey, it could be worse! It is usually easily curable.

        • Wendy Allen

          HI,
          Gluten may cause any kind of cancer. Gluten may hurt brain/body and cause many health issues also. Radiation may cause problems, but doctors may not be trained in Celiac so don’t mention it. Untreated Celiac may let the rest of the health get worse and cancer come back. Blood tests/biopsies may not work to diagnose Celiac. Cyrex labs may help recently. My friend had her thyroid taken out. I take generic synthroid and Amour. I don’t like animals hurt. Amour has T3 and calcitonin. Synthroid may have hidden gluten in it which may hurt. Zinc/Se/ enough iron/probiotic may help T4 convert to T3. I am glad you are doing well. Best wishes.

          • Khs1380

            I have a severely under active thyroid. I take naturethroid with Cytomel(T3). I do not convert T4 to T3. For any of you that do not covert, the reason is due to the fact that your liver will not filter the T4 correctly. The liver is what converts T4 into T3. It’s a medical fact that people need T3 in order for the body to function correctly. The only reason people need to take T4 is to get T3. That only helps those who can convert! Unfortunately not enough doctors believe in T3 and only prescribe T4. These doctors are only interested in the kick backs they get for prescribing Synthroid!! It’s all about big pharm rather than helping patients!!!

    • offkey

      Are you taking brand name Synthroid? I just checked the prices in the US for 100mcg and they are around $28-35 a month. Naturethroid is a lot less expensive for me. And works for me, as opposed to synthetic, now that I don’t have a thyroid.

      • lp

        Thank you for that info! I will discuss with my doctor.

  • jaedeal

    Not everyone can process generic, as I cannot and I pay 43.00 a month for synthroid and it does not work as well as it should for me and I have struggles since age 8. 39 years and 2300. dollars in medicine later and I have side affect from the synthroid but have never been given medicines from pigs but if it made my health better I
    would like that option.

    • Hannibal Smith

      You can buy it overseas from IAS. It might cost more ($42 seems overpriced for Synthroid), but you’ll get full spectrum.

      Do note that if T4 alone isn’t doing the job, that means rT3 is inhibiting conversion of T4 into T3. Which means something else is going on that should be looked into medically (yeah, I’m not holding my breath either).

      There’s also a new Life Extension supplement with herb extracts that may complement Synthroid, but it would be better to experiment with the three ingredients individually to derive which confounding factor is at play.

      Also, there is a synthetic dual T3 / T4 that may be covered by insurance.

      • flowwalker

        Are you saying you can obtain natural thyroid (with, we hope both T3 and T4 in it) from IAS? If so, I am very glad to hear it, in case natural thyroid becomes unavailable in the US. How do you contact IAS?

        In general, a natural form is always better than some altered synthetic form, so far as I’m concerned. Some synthetics are absolutely deadly.

        As mentioned in my response below, the list of possible side effects for Synthroid is very long, and some of them are dangerous — such as thickening of the heart wall and bone loss. Some of these side effects could harm people behind the scenes for years before being discovered. By contrast, Armour natural thyroid has no side effects for most people.

        • Hannibal Smith

          You can Google it.

          But do keep in mind there is prescription T3 available branded as Cytomel or generic as liothyronine. You just need to find a physician or endocrinologist who is open minded. Most are just not interested in committing career risk by rocking the boat.

      • phoenix23002

        Hannibal, I know you meant well, but thanks for putting that source on an open forum. The FDA is working overtime shutting those sources down. Please… please don’t do it again? There are natural thyroid groups that are glad to share sources privately.

        • Hannibal Smith

          The FDA knows about IAS so its not an open secret or anything. Under current law, we all have the right to “import” a 90-day supply of any drug for personal use. Running away and hiding from the FDA in the shadows solves nothing; engagement will protect and preserve your rights.

      • Nikki Heath

        I will not take any form of synthroid. Doing some research shows that it immobilizes the thyroid completely. I take kelp, selenium, d3, maca (balances hormones), fo-ti (adrenals, thyroid, detoxifies the body, regulates estrogen levels, overall a good herb), bladderwrack also helps thyroid and metabolism, nettle leaf helps adrenals. If anyone is not addressing the rest of the endocrine system they should. If you’ve been under a lot of stress and your adrenals are compromised, your thyroid meds won’t be working properly

    • Wendy Allen

      Synthroid may have gluten in it and doesn’t have T3 or calcitonin. See the longer above comment. Best wishes.

  • AJ

    The lower dollar amount for Synthroid as stated by a fellow commenter in this section must be for generic T4, or that person has an awesome health insurance plan. Synthroid in my area is much higher and its cost is in line with the amount quoted in the article. I have been prescribed thyroid replacement therapy for over 35 years and was prescribed synthetic T4 for all that time until six months ago. I am no longer able to convert T4 to the active T3. My life now depends upon the desiccated pig thyroid! This was a difficult decision for me as prior to making this change, I lived my life as a vegan without use or consumption of any animal products for over eight years. There may be a day for any one of us to be faced with a decision such as this. Since the change, I actually feel much better using the desiccated hormone than I ever did with Synthroid, or any of the other generic hormone replacement. The bonus…it does less cost than Synthroid as also stated in the article.

    • Wendy Allen

      See my longer comment above. You can convert T4 to T3 by Zinc/Se/enough iron/probiotic…but gluten maybe not letting you absorb these in foods/supplements.

    • Nikki Heath

      I will not take any form of synthroid. Doing some research shows that it immobilizes the thyroid completely. I take kelp, selenium, d3, maca (balances hormones), fo-ti (adrenals, thyroid, detoxifies the body,regulates estrogen levels, overall a good herb), bladderwrack also helps thyroid and metabolism, nettle leaf helps adrenals. If anyone is not addressing the rest of the endocrine system they should. If you’ve been under a lot of stress and your adrenals are compromised, your thyroid meds won’t be working properly

  • Deborah Zagorski

    I have been taking compounded armour thyroid for 7 yrs this is the only medication that works for me as my body doesn’t convert T4 into T3 the synthetic doesn’t work for me at all

    • Wendy Allen

      Zinc/Se/enough iron/probiotic may help T4 convert to T3. Gluten may lower minerals absorbed in intestines. See my above comment. Best wishes.

      • Deborah Zagorski

        I take 30mg of zinc 300mcg of selenium ,7000 units of D 18 mg of iron, probiotics every day all this I get from life extension and I don’t eat soy or gluten , plus no cheese or milk . my body still doesn’t make T3 , but thankful for your suggestion.

        • Wendy Allen

          HI, 200mcg of Se maybe good. I take 5000IU of Vit D3. I take higher Zinc due to detoxing removes Zinc. I can’t get iron to work in me, but I have Lyme which may lower iron/Mg/Mn. Probiotics help T4 change to T3 and make B vitamins and Vit K. Detoxing may help chemical reactions unblock. Hair tests show good minerals/heavy metals. Far Infrared Sauna may help detox heavy metals/chemicals fast. Electrodermal testing/Genova tests may also work. Hidden gluten/GMO may hurt the gut lining so food/supplements may not absorb. I eat nothing in a box/bag/label since it may have hidden gluten. LDN may help block hidden gluten. Best wishes.

      • phoenix23002

        Wendy.. the conversion of T 4 to T 3 takes place in the liver. Some of us could take a boatload of supplements and it would make NO difference in the conversion. Selenium (no more that 200 – 400 mcgs), good iron, B 12, D 3 and optimally functioning adrenals certainly help to stabilize and optimize thyroid dosage but some of us need the desiccated thyroid extract. Nothing else is going to do the trick. oh… iodine can be helpful also.

        • Wendy Allen

          Milk thistle, lecithin, glutathione and more may help the liver.

          • phoenix23002

            Wendy.. I am just glad that you have found a solution to your conversion problem. And I agree, especially about the milk thistle and glutathione. IP 6 Gold can also help a fatty liver. So many people have that condition.

        • Nikki Heath

          Phoenix, what’s also effective is B6 as well as Ashwaghanda

  • Wendy Allen

    Synthroid has gluten in it? Gluten may make antibodies to the thyroid. Celiac may cause low thyroid, but people may only get thyroid medicine and no Celiac help. I need no gluten/hidden gluten/dairy/soy/sugar/GMO/heated oils/food with a label (may have hidden gluten/GMO)…take vitamins/good oils/minerals…probiotic…LDN..detoxing. I take generic Synthroid and Amour in the morning. The T4 gets me thought the night like time release. Zinc/Se/enough iron/probiotic..help convert T4 to T3. T1/T2/calcitonin are important in the Amour. T3 in the Amour helps instant energy.

  • dharmatrek

    Being vegan, i refuse to extend my unnatural lifetime by consuming a by-product of Animal murder….BUT…that’s me, and only me; synthroid is a viciously pernicious drug ha made my hair fall out, and screwed up my bowels severely. Fortunately, my “thyroid condition” was merely a completely screwed up lab report. i think there must be a better alternative to dead animal and poison…..but; it is no surprise that the “FDA” (or-corporate pig cabal) would consider banning anything natural in favouer of lab poison.

    • goldenrule

      Dead animal poison? You are silly….

      • dharmatrek

        you missed the “and”…i hardly consider my experience and my conclusions “silly”.

  • goldenrule

    Armour has worked very well for me for many years….I have been able to decrease my dosage quite a bit due to detoxing. I pray this stays available for us!

  • Wayne

    The prices I see in this article do not corespond to my experience. It says List prices for synthetic thyroid run around $40 for 30 tablets (100mcg) but in 2013 I paid $8.80 for 66 tablets and I think the price would be the same for 90. It goes on to say Armour goes for around $20 for 30 tablets (60mg) but I paid $17.88 for 90, no insurance. I did not get satisfactory resyults from the T4 and felt a sharp drop in energy when I tried the desicated thyroid. I found I coud get 25 mcg T3 (by Grossman) for $.20 each. Initially I got good results only with the proper combination of T3 and hydrocortisone. the 2 points are that there is no one solution for all and that it is n ot nearly as expensive as the article indicates.

    • offkey

      Synthroid and Armour both have had price increases in the last year, even w/ insurance.

  • Nikki Heath

    The FDA targeted Armour several years ago when they forced Forest Industries to change their formula. Since then, Armour doesn’t work as well as it used to

    • Hannibal Smith

      Probably because the dose is more accurate now, i.e. as stated on the label as opposed to being stronger. Manufacturer’s of DTEs have long had consistency and dosage problems. Besides the fact DTE is not even bioidentical and not even in a human ratio. So there’s some negative bias to overcome.

      • Nikki Heath

        Well, it worked before and now it doesn’t for me and for 95% of people who used to use it. Plus, was able to take sublingually and now you can’t. I would say the dosage is NOT correct.

      • offkey

        Both Synthroid and Levoxyl have been recalled for problems also.

  • Kathy Mack

    My question is – why do I have to keep taking higher doses of Synthtoid (generic – my doc won’t RX me brand name)? When I started on it s few years ago, I think I was put on 100 mcg. Then 112, 125 and now I am at 150. My TSH is not at an optimal level (it’s at 5) and the only slight difference I feel is less burning/tingling in my toes and my hair stopped falling out (although it’s doesn’t seem to be growing back).

  • lindasartori

    Erin Elizabeth lifted this article and published it under her byline. Yes, at the end of the article it is stated that the article originally appeared in anh-usa, but it misleads the reader into thinking that Erin Elizabeth wrote the article.
    She does this frequently, putting her byline under someone else’s headline, then adding at the end of the article that it appeared elsewhere, but letting the reader think she wrote it.

  • mlredmond

    I am international board certified for regression therapy. I had a client come to me with a thyroid problem. She went into an altered state and we found the reason for the issue and the healing information. Her body told her the answers and it was most loving. Several months later, with applying the information, she told me that she did not need her medication anymore. We have the answers, if we want them. We need to fix ourselves and not look to others for our answers to life.

  • Donna Wiant

    I am takingoing Synthroid and paying $96 for 3 months. I would love to know how to convert to Armour or an equivalent. Forget the doctor, they are not listening. Plus, my Medicare and supplimental insurance no longer wants to pay for my endo!

  • Nikki Heath

    Unfortunately, back in 2010 FDA forced Forest Industries to change the formula of Armour Thyroid and it isn’t as effective as it used to be.
    What’s going on with most people is the fact that our bodies are not converting T4 to T3. Taking a synthetic with just T4 doesn’t do any good and people still have all the symptoms. So, in essence our government wants us sick and throwing money away to Pharma, while they kill us.