The Alliance For Natural Health

FDA ‘Powerless’ Re: BPA?

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For three years, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel has written about the government’s failure to regulate bisphenol A (BPA). Now, even as the agency retracts its previous contention that BPA is safe, troubling new evidence surfaces regarding the FDA’s inaction.

According to Meg Kissinger of the Journal Sentinel, FDA “officials say they are powerless to regulate BPA. A quirk in the rules allows BPA makers to skirt federal regulation.” FDA officials had told the newspaper they were frustrated by the antiquated framework of the FDA’s regulatory process.

Kwater bottlesissinger continues: “An agency source says some from within the FDA wanted to follow Canada’s lead and ban [BPA] from baby bottles — or from the lining of infant formula cans — but administration officials have resisted, concerned that babies who rely on bottled formula would be left without healthy alternatives.”

“They couldn’t take it off the shelves when there aren’t substitutes in place,” said the source, who asked not to be identified because the issue is so politically charged.

BPA was found in the urine of 93 percent of all Americans tested. Even the FDA now calls it a “safety concern” for fetuses, babies and young children. Given FDA officials’ acknowledgement that their own regulatory process is antiquated, it’s time to reform the agency: not just patch it but fix it once and for all.

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  • einzigal

    The “Take action on this issue” link is broken.

  • cwcoonce

    BPA (like rBGH, GMOs, and 168 other chemicals) is deliberately injected into the food supply. They have their reasons.

  • Ruth A. Yacko

    Conscience dictates action must be taken to find a “safe” (not necessarily cheaper) alternative to BPA due to its potential dangers.

  • Joseph C. Moore, Cpo USN Ret.

    Like the rest of our corrupt govenment, the FDA mixes hyperbole and sleight-of-hand to misinform the public for the benefit of the coffers.

  • Tom Rowan

    Well, if the FDA won’t do anything to remove BPA from cans or baby bottles, then it’s time for the consumer to look for alternatives. Glass baby bottles and purchasing sauces in jars instead of cans could be another way to send a message.

  • Ann Curtis

    That’s hogwash. If they really wanted to ban it, and really wanted to help babies and keep them safe, and really wanted to help all Americans so that no one has BPA in their blood/urine, they could do something about it. The fact that there is a “loophole” is the FDA’s way of saying that they can’t do anything: the plastics lobbying is too big and too political. Everything’s always about the money and power, no matter what way you cut it. Saying they can’t do anything is an easy cop-out for them.

  • Yvonne Vallone

    Please stop the madness – we are poisoning our children with bpa in products and it seems the fda is in denial or to worried about the businesses they are trying to protect.

  • There is a problem with the link for taking action on the FDA not taking action to ban BPA. The link is not found.
    http://www.anh-usa.org/new_site/visit https://secure3/convio.net/aahf/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=487

  • To the folks at the FDA–what part of do your damn job do you not understand? If you can’t do the job, please retire or enter private corporate work instead of doing public corporate work.

    Just saying.

  • Grover Syck

    about par for the course. The FDA is bought and paid for by the companies they are supposed to regulate.

    The consumers ( of both food and drugs ) are being trampled by the producers.

  • This is outrageous. Our children are ending up with disrupted endocrine systems leading to obesity, diabetes, hypothyroid and the like. And the FDA fiddles while Rome burns.

    http://www.acupuncturebrooklyn.com/liver/karen-vaughan-chemicals-and-obesity-what-if-isnt-all-your-fault