Dietitians Are Buying Coke’s Line: Sugar, Artificial Colors are SAFE for Children!

June 14, 2011
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coke ADAWe wish we could say we are surprised. Registered dietitians are now being given formal education by the Coca-Cola Company on how safe its ingredients are.

The credentialing arm of the American Dietetic Association, the Commission on Dietetic Registration (CDR), has approved a program created by the The Coca-Cola Company Beverage Institute for Health and Wellness.This covers what it calls “urban myths” about the safety of food ingredients. Participating in this program will earn registered dietitians Continuing Professional Education unit credits.

“Children’s Dietary Recommendations: When Urban Myths, Opinions, Parental Perceptions & Evidence Collide,” tells dietitians that sugar, artificial colors and nonnutritive sweeteners have been “carefully examined for their effects on children’s health, growth, and development.” The presenter, Dr. Ronald Kleinman, “explores prevalent misconceptions about these food ingredients” and suggests ways the dietitian can help quell unnecessary “concern among parents about their children’s health.”

At first glance, Dr. Kleinman should know what he is talking about. He is physician-in-chief at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, chief of the Pediatric Gastrointestinal and Nutrition Unit, and Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Couldn’t sound better, could it? But he has also received a great deal of money from industry sources—like artificial infant formula manufacturers Mead Johnson and Nestle Ltd. His study on optimal duration of breastfeeding was funded by Gerber Products. He also served as a paid expert witness for Gerber when they were sued for deceptive advertising. And he contributed to a brochure intended for children entitled “Variety’s Mountain” produced by the Sugar Association.

Now he’s being sponsored by the Coca-Cola Company and telling dietitians that the ingredients in Coke which everyone is alarmed about are safe. The dietitians, in turn, will be telling parents that their fears are unfounded, and Coke can sell more Coke to kids.

Program materials include gems like “[a] majority of studies so far have not found a link between sugar and behavior in children generally or children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.” This is certainly news to us, since we have seen many studies that say the opposite. Apparently the dietitians are to teach us that any connection between artificial colors and neurotoxicity, or fears of the dangers of fluoride, are imaginary and come from hysterical (or at least unduly concerned) parents.

As we reported recently, sugar and artificial sweeteners are anything but safe. Fluoride poses a significant risk to the kidneys. And commonly used food dyes pose risks which include hyperactivity in children, cancer (in animal studies), and allergic reactions. Even the Center for Science in the Public Interest, an organization that supports nuking food, agrees with this. And the British government and European Union have taken actions that are virtually ending the use of dyes throughout Europe.

The ADA is sponsored by the soda and junk food industries—which we feel greatly tarnishes the organization’s credibility. And you may recall that the ADA has mounted a state-by-state campaign to make sure that its Commission is the only one which will be accepted as a credentialing body for both registered dietitians and nutritionists.

There are, of course, significant philosophical differences between nutritionists and dietitians—they represent two different fields of study and practice. By accepting only a single credentialing agency—one run by the dietitians, not nutritionists—state boards are establishing a “one-size-fits-all” standard which removes all competition, essentially handing the ADA a government mandated monopoly over nutritional therapy.

Unfortunately, the Nevada bill we told you about last month passed both the Assembly and the Senate and was signed by the governor on June 5th. While some amendments were made, the most troubling parts of the bill still remain: only registered dietitians can practice “dietetics,” which is defined by the law to include nutrition assessment, evaluation, diagnosis, counseling, intervention, monitoring and treatment—everything that a good nutritionist does and should do.

We also told you about an ADA bill in New York, S.3556. The state’s Senate Finance Committee met on June 13 and decided to pass the bill to the Rules Committee so that it could be considered on the Senate floor. They are trying to rush these bills through, because next week the Assembly is scheduled to finish its work for the year, unless the chair calls a special session in the fall. Please click on our New York Action Alert here.

The ADA’s power grab is a complete travesty. We will keep fighting it state by state until we restore competition in nutritional counseling and stop gagging PhD-trained nutritionists who don’t become dietitians.

152 Responses to “Dietitians Are Buying Coke’s Line: Sugar, Artificial Colors are SAFE for Children!”

  1. Mike says:

    It’s probably time to start a new accrediting body that has the interests of the people as it’s main objective. A body that can actually be trusted. We can’t expect our government that is itself corrupted to create a regulating body that is not corrupted. Whether it’s the CDR or the FDA it’s all the same. It’s sadly almost always about the money. The only reason all this nonsense is allowed to continue is that most of the public is unaware of the truth, but the truth will always find it’s way to the top. Corporate dollars can’t hide it forever.

    In our office we help type 2 diabetics almost fully recover on a regular basis. Our guidelines are almost the opposite of what the hospital dieticians are teaching them to eat. In a couple of weeks we turn their lives around by teaching the correct information. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not that dieticians are bad it’s just that they are often being led by a corrupt body.

    We have to start making some changes in this country. We can’t afford not to.

       2 likes

  2. Mayra Osterstuck says:

    There is apparently a bundle to identify about this. I think you made some good points in features also.

       0 likes

  3. Joseph says:

    This is the same strategy Rockefeller and Carnegie used to push out natural non toxic medical practices
    Here’s an excerpt ( article at http://www.sntp.net/fda/piper_griffin.htm )
    Dr. David L. Edsall at one time was the Dean of the Harvard Medical School. The conditions he describes at Harvard are the same as those at every other medical school in America:

    I was, for a period, a professor of therapeutics and pharmacology, and I knew from experience that students were obliged then by me and by others to learn about an interminable number of drugs, many of which were valueless, many of them useless, some probably, even harmful . . . Almost all subjects must be taken at exactly the same time, and in almost exactly in the same way by all students, and the amount introduced into each course is such that few students have time or energy to explore any subject in a spirit of independent interest. A little comparison shows that there is less intellectual freedom in the medical course than in almost any other form of professional education in this country.(12)

    Yes, he who pays the piper does call the tune. It may not be humanly possible for those who finance the medical schools to determine what is taught in every minute detail. But such is not necessary to achieve the cartel’s desired goals. One can be sure, however, that there is total control over what is not taught, and that, under no circumstances will even one of Rockefeller’s shiny dimes ever go to a medical college, to a hospital, to a teaching staff, or to a researcher that holds the unorthodox view that the best medicine is in nature. Because of its generous patron, orthodoxy always will fiddle a tune of man-made drugs. Whatever basic nutrition may be allowed into the melody will be minimal at best, and it will be played over and over again that natural sources of vitamins are in no way superior to those that are man-made or synthesized. The day when orthodox medicine finally embraces the field of nutrition will be the day when the cartel behind it also has monopolized the vitamin and food product industry essential to it – not one day before.

    In the meantime, while doctors are forced to spend hundreds of hours studying the names and actions of all kinds of man-made drugs, they are lucky if they receive even a portion of a single course on basic nutrition. Many have none at all. The result is that the average doctor’s wife or secretary knows more about practical nutrition than he does.

       3 likes

  4. John says:

    Just more of the same ole garbage. Money doesn’t talk, it screams! More and more I’m learning that big corporations will do anything to raise profits and shareholder value, no matter how many people it damages. Our government is made up of sell-outs that only respond to anyone willing to give them money for any cause. We cannot sue drug companies or doctors now for vaccine damage, but the taxpayers have paid over $2 billion dollars to victims. Where is the justice in that.

    Now we will see children continuing to drink coca cola and believe it is good for them. Do these people think we are stupid? Yes, or they wouldn’t dare, or would they? The ADA is a joke, always has been and is nothing more than another arm of drug companies promoting their agenda.

    The money is really screaming now.

    good luck

       1 likes

  5. I am sorry that the conventional medical community does not really understand orthomoleular medicine.
    Most liciensed nutritonists are allowing fake potatoes and canned gravey……WHAT IS THE SALT CONTENT?

       0 likes

  6. Carol says:

    Here in New Zealand a well known dietitian and nutritionalist was featured in many magazine ‘advertorials’ claiming the safety and health benefits of Diet Coke. There was even a nice picture of the stuff placed next to healthy food to push the point. In tiny print at the end of the two page spread …. This article is sponsored by Coca Cola. As the saying goes “follow the money”.

       1 likes

  7. Tony says:

    I actually read samples of both the Dietitians and Nutritionists Board Exams, and I was alarmed by the questions asked in the Dietitians exam. A ton of questions dealt with measurements, drug contraindications, and so forth; on the other hand, the Nutritionists Exam dealt with hard core science and nutrition for specific populations. My background is in biology/neuro sciences so I can certainly tell the difference. What a shame we are being so deceived into illness.

    Meanwhile, every time I’ve had to go to the hospital weather it was for my Grandma’s hip fracture, a birth, etc, I am always amazed to see these diets formulated by Dietitians. For God’s sake, a patient with cardiovascular disease gets margarine, hydrogenated oils and all. How could these be occurring, even today! It is utterly amazing to me. Is this some sick joke?

       1 likes

  8. CitizenSlave says:

    Since WHEN does coke use SUGAR????
    Its all High Fructose Corn Syrup, which is NOT sugar!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    And its NOT the same. No matter what ‘they’ tell you.
    Don’t believe me, try making chocolate without using (cane) sugar.

    Sucrose and fructose are different, thats why there are 2 names/terms for them
    Gas, diesel its the same; liquid energy. Just put it in your car.

    They are trying to morph the term ’sugar’ to include corn sugar. So once again, fuel is fuel?
    Its lies to make THEM more money at your health.

       0 likes

  9. nyscof says:

    It’s interesting that, after many people called Coca Cola complaining, they took down the offensive power point presentation by Dr. Kleinman who is an adviser to the American Council on Science and Health, an organization that derives lots of money from industries that may profit from fluoride sales and tooth decay.

    It’s too bad people couldn’t hear how Dr. Kleinman lied to his granddaughter about why she shouldn’t swallow her fluoridated toothpaste. He said it was because the toothpaste’s decay preventing capabilities were “used up.” Of course, that’s not true. It’s because fluoride is a poison if swallowed and it’s says so on the back of the tube and carton.

    So now, when no one is looking, his granddaugher may eat the bubble-gum flavored toothpaste just because it tastes good. If grandpa will lie to his own granddaughter, and in effect put her in harm’s way, do you truly believe he would tell dietitians or the American public the truth? I think not.

       1 likes

  10. DyeDiet says:

    I’ve meant “better brain OR the heart tissue. Sorry. I am frustrated…

       1 likes

  11. DyeDiet says:

    They say there is not enough evidence that the artificial colors caused ADHD, rashes, cancers and asthma. Yes, maybe so. Bu WHY almost everybody are missing the point that THERE IS NOT enough evidence that they do not! Most of the food dyes are azo compounds (-N=N-). Those are prone to be reduced to anilines and benzidines in the human body. And in the process they may damage DNA as many other azo compounds.Even if they have lower acute toxicity they SIMPLY have NO BUSINESS in our body. What can it build out of the anilines and benzidines, better brain of the heart tissue? No way! This is the point I am trying to bring in my publications at the Dyediet.com

    Let us free our diet of the dictate of the food industry!

       2 likes

  12. Romina, MS, RD, CNSC says:

    I am absolutely astonished at the lack of truth being bantered about. As a Registered Dietitian, I do not agree with many actions of the American Dietetic Association. It is very easy to sit back and criticize their stance, however, the likelihood of changing their viewpoint is slim. It is a political machine that is attached to the arm of the credentialing agency for people who believe in nutrition. If you were to ask most dietitians, they went into practice because they believe in nutrition not politics. The politics of the relationship of the ADA with the food industry, while disconcerting at times, has little to do with day to day practice of reputable dietitians. As in any field of practice, there are good and incompetent practitioners, but that does not mean an entire industry is corrupt or inept. I am incredulous at the suggestion that dietitians do not have education in nutrition. Exactly what do people think Registered Dietitians study? We are not marketing or busines majors, but rather professionals who have studied the foundation of nutrition and its effect on the human body down to the micronutrient level. Many of us hold a masters degree in Nutrition. So to say we do not know nutrition because our title reflects a different name is silly. Anyone can call themselves a nutritionist. The person at the retail outlet for the latest in supplements can call themselves nutritionist. Does that make them more reputable? Doubtful. People label themselves with a title, and suddenly, they become that title, despite a lack of training. Why are people so upset? If you are a PhD nutritionist, label yourself as such. Your education speaks for itself, just as my credentials do. Those opposed can say what they will about Registered Dietitians, but we let our training speak for itself, just as any licensed and registered practitioners. That is not to say, that I am blind to the fallacies and confusion for consumers due to the food industry. Careful when looking where to place blame. Dietitians are not food producers. Believe me, if our industry was heard more often, we would have a lot more to say about our food supply. The irony, is many believe they know about food, because of what they eat. That is not evidence based practice. Finally, the argument presented about hospital cafeterias being controlled by dietitians is riduculous. Food service companies, under contract with the hospitals, often led by individuals without any nutritional training, but experience in pushing sales are running your cafeterias. The dietitians, who don’t usually eat the big selling items themselves, have absolutely nothing to do with meal choices. It is about the dollar, and making a profit, not about health and nutrition. So if you are angry about it, tell your hospital administrators to start listening to the dietitians, not the person who worked their way up from the dishwasher position. Clue in to how things really work!

       4 likes

  13. Another RD says:

    I am not surprised by this “food fight”and “blame game” resulting from this article. I work as a RD in Oncology and on a daily basis have to defend and promote food and healthy lifestyle etc. Somehow some patients and some consumers (as evidenced in this very emotional discussion above) have this belief that there is this huge conspiracy to control us.

    When we start from within and vote with our wallets, our knowledge, integrity and personal beliefs! Big business will eventually be affected by this (unless I am very naive!). If we step back and choose a diet with a variety of whole foods, avoid processed foods as much as possible and eliminate chemicals labelled and packaged as “food” – the corporate world will lose its stronghold on us or maybe change their philosophy and support our goals and beliefs.

    I am proud to be a RD, for the education I have and the effort I make daily to stay educated and informed regarding current issues, evidence based practice etc. I can not please everyone with the message that I convey but I know that I can help and guide many individuals to the best of my ability.

    My husband as a Chiropractor is also frustrated in his profession by individuals who dilute his profession by acting as nutrition specialists, supplement peddlers (who make lots of money being concerned about their patients nutritional health, pushing vitamin and herbal supplements to line their pockets). The same could be said by many other a profession who address nutrition with minimal education and training.

    We all have to eat! That makes nutrition such a hot topic (for propaganda, exploitation and blame).

    When will we stop blaming anyone and everyone but ourselves for the choices we make?

       2 likes

    • dez says:

      So then it is OK to push, sell and profit from drugs, but not to sell, profit from vitamins, minerals, herbal, and supplements. CDC reported no death from supplements in 2009.

         0 likes

  14. RC says:

    “science” goes to the highest bidder

       1 likes

  15. Ann Cockrell says:

    As to FLUORIDE— it is an ENZYME INHIBITOR and affects the THYROID. Also as studies in
    CHINA and INDIA has shown, natural fluoride of more than 4 parts per million LOWER the IQ level of the children. FLUORIDE does NOT NEED to be INGESTED, just topically applied. INGESTED, fluoride causes many problems. Read: FLUORIDE THE AGING FACTOR by Dr. John Yiamouyiannis (a biochemist who was editor of Chemical Abstracts Service and is a world-leading authority on biological effects of fluoride) and THE CASE AGAINST FLUORIDE by Dr. Paul
    Connett.

       1 likes

  16. I am a dietitian and there is no way in hell I would sell out to coke or sugar subs or natural caffeine or what ever gimmick they try. Most of the people do this for money for you to say that all dietitians are going to promote coke is not right. some may still have their head stuck in the sand but most of us know better but then money speaks.
    Hospitals have nothing to do with improving your health nutritionally. They are powered by doctors making money. That is why I quit and would never work in a hospital again. The dietitian’s have nothing to do with food service at hospitals except make changes on the menus according to the doctor’s order. I give this article a very poor rating. Let’s talk about the power of money these large companies have and how they are destroying our nutritional value and causing cancer to rise. Now that’s the real subject here.

       2 likes

  17. Thurston says:

    This along with the attempts to banish any other form or nutritional information (in California trying to ban nutritionists from practicing) is dangerous.

    They are taking all the power and with no responsibility. We’ve less freedom to choose than ever and we’ve never been so unhealthy.

    http://thurstonpym.com/post/6587206897/are-dietitians-influenced-by-coke-and-other-sponsors

       0 likes

    • RD says:

      In your article you state..

      “The argument against is that anyone can call themselves nutritionists and may have little or no qualifications and the ADA want to ‘protect’ us from such people. There are so many reasons why this does not make sense.”

      I believe there are many reasons why this makes perfect sense.

      Yes, I agree there are many well educated people with years and years of experience, education and expertise regarding nutrition, that are not dietitians. This is great and makes for a diverse and strong field.

      But by having no standardized qualification for calling one’s self a nutritionist, anyone can call them self a nutritionist, anyone. Look in the phone book, many nutritionist are out there. If you needed to see one, how would you know who is qualified or has the expertise/background needed to help you? I have met at self proclaimed nutritionist before, this individual had no formal education or schooling, but spent a lot of time in the gym and was trained by a personal trainer in the past. This person felt qualified to carry this title. Now tell me, honestly, do you think this person is qualified to be have this credentialing?

         1 likes

      • dez says:

        ADA is about control and profit, not health. If this health nut is advising people about what not to eat, Like ‘processed’ sugars, vegetable oils, processed and packaged foods, white flour, white rice, chemical laden junk foods, drinks, and to exercise. Is teaching and encourage the use of vitamins, minerals and supplements, you bet I would listen. I personally have a lousy diet, living 45 miles from the nearest supermarket and can’t afford to run to town to get fresh food every week. I depend on vitamins, minerals and supplements to keep me healthy and detox my body. The bottom line, coca cola is a for profit corporation

           0 likes

  18. Nat says:

    Based on this article, I posted a negative rating for Dr. Kleinman on “Vitals” website and copy and pasted this link for patients to read. I encourage others to do the same. We have to stop the corrupt influence of corporations in our daily lives. When it comes to the health of our children, let’s have a no tolerance policy

       1 likes

  19. Jeanne Shepard says:

    If there are RDs who do not support this nonsense and rubber stamp the “all things in moderation” crap they need to stand up and make their positions known. I’m sorry to say, I don’t know any who do, and it reduces my respect for the profession, in general.

       0 likes

    • RD says:

      I’m sorry you only know bad dietitians.

         0 likes

    • Kevin G says:

      I am an RD with a Masters in nutrition and I HATE! the fact that the ADA has corporate sponsors such as coke and Pepsi. It’s an embarrassment and does not represent my views as a professional at all. Every RD I have spoke with about this issue is not happy about it. I have written and spoken to the ADA multiple times in protest. Hopefully, things will change in the future as I think that ‘partnering’ with such organizations only harms our profession.

         4 likes

  20. John says:

    All one has to do is go into a hospital and be given the food menu to choose what you want for breakfast, lunch or diner to realize the dieticians are not only not educated on what any human being needs for nutrition, but can see IGNORANCE written all over the page. To even think this group of people have the least amount of education and the ability to direct anyone on what to eat is ludicrous.

    Hospitals are not only the dirtiest places in the world, but filled with people that simply do NOT have a clue how to make a person healthy, only treat a symptom or manage a disease and then watch them wither away eating junk with literally no food value while being sanctioned by some very agenda driven organization that caters to the drug companies and food industry in America.

       1 likes

  21. Joan Pfeiffer says:

    Thank you to the above thoughtful writers who do not put all professioanals w/ specific credentials into the same camp! Is it true that clinical dietitians can get deceived into believing some products are ok because they work for short-term gains in some illnesses? Of course! But it is also quite true that many of us are very thoughtful, read articles that support exclusive breastfeeding, midwifery, naturopathy, organic and sustainable REAL foods, holistically good for not only people, but the environment. It is shallow to believe that a corporate entity such as the ADA (just like the AMA) speaks for all in the field! I haven’t been a member for many years, since their conferences allow corporate sponsorships such as formula companies. But I will not get caught up in the hysteria of some, who damage their own credebility. I will definately let ADA i am unhappy with this partnership, so I thank the friend who brought it to my attention!

       0 likes

  22. David says:

    After spending $30,000 and twenty years trying to educate the American public with blockbuster articles laying bare the deceit essential for liars and hypocrites to succeed, the resonse is so meager these days that I am tempted to put out my thumb and hitch a ride on the corporate bandwagon. To call many Americans zombies is to insult zombies.

       0 likes

    • dez says:

      True! Few will or do take charge of their health and are led ‘like the sheep to slaughter’.

         1 likes

  23. Carrie says:

    No one is arguing that this is a good thing, Coke is healthy, etc.

    That said, just b/c your mom/aunt/friend saw some kind of dietary correlation in something means that it is empirically true. Dietitians are supposed to look at peer-reviewed studies and use evidence based medicine to guide their practice. And to be honest, there are things we believe anecdotally to be true, but they are not consistently found in study results. For something to be considered absolutely true, it should be demonstrable in numerous situations/studies.

    Remember, anyone can make a website with convincing, alarmist health claims. Just b/c you read it on a website is not the same thing as a MD/RD/RN who has read dozens of studies on that issue. The general public does not understand what makes a good research study and whether or not that study can reliably be applied to populations.

    The ADA is not all RDs. And no one is buying us stuff or giving us pens or taking the vast majority us to fancy dinners.

       2 likes

    • dez says:

      I have read many hundreds of studies and reports. When I see a ‘peer’ review, a red light comes on. Figures don,t lie, but peers do, It takes 40 years or more for Peers to die off so real progress can be made. When I see ‘peer’ report, I check it out, searching for ‘real hands’on’ doctors and researchers who tell of failures as well as successes, with 40, 60, years or more of real life experience. Most do not accept the word ‘incurable’, or are supported by Big pharma’s, AMA’s, or government money. Many are saving or extending the lives
      of those given up on by conventional medicine.

         0 likes

    • Most if not all of the research grants for nutrition and dietetics departments in Universities are funded by foundations owned and supported by multinational food corporations. The universities are where the brain washing starts. Most dietitians need Continuing Education Units which generously provided by companies such as nestle, pepsi, coke. This problem is deeply rooted and will be up to Dietitians to question multi national ‘big food’ corporations support food policy
      Units

         0 likes

  24. Natalie says:

    Ultimately dietitians and nutritionists are working towards the same goal. Just as in every profession, there will always be some bad dietitians and some bad nutritionists. Why waste so much time and effort trying to make dietitians look bad when there are far more important issues to focus on? If you are trying to gain more respect in your profession, start emphasizing your positive attributes.

       0 likes

  25. Matt Nesral, RD, LN says:

    The brain washing is to think that all dietitians fall into one group. Wake up! We are so caught up with social networking that the internet is filled with worthless topics. Yes, ADA has crappy sponsors, but those same crappy sponsors our controlling our foods system (even the health food system). They are not going away. Goes to show american society and their labeling of human beings across the globe. Ignorant stereotyping.

    Human nature is sad and american ideals is saddest.

       0 likes

  26. Steve says:

    My dad, 79 years old, had a PEG for tube feeding because he couldn’t swallow food. The RD gave him a solution of HFCS & soy protein isolate, both toxic foods, and said it was the best food available and the only food Medicare would cover. I complained and gave her two books explaining in detail why these are toxic foods and she dismissed them out of hand as being just the opinion of the authors. I did all I could to get dad well and out of the nursing home as soon as possible so he could eat some real food again! He is now doing very well at home.

    I wasn’t mad at the RD, she was just doing her job as she was trained and within the limits of the system. I was mad at the system that created such incompetence and limitations. Personal initiative had been trained out of her and insurance controlled what food my dad could be fed. All I wanted was for dad to receive good nutrition, and they failed miserably!

       0 likes

  27. jim adams says:

    Most Coca cola seems to have High Fructose Corn Syrup as it’s major sugar, followed by sucrose, for a total of 40 .5 grams of sugar in a 12 ounce can — equivalent to 10 teaspoons per can. Someone should ask Kleinman if a) he has kids, and b) if he was involved with their feeding and putting to bed when they were14 years old and younger. Any one who has been around kids in the evening, given them soda (including coke) and then had to deal with their behavior would NEVER say that sugar doesn’t affect kids. I would also like to know what his kids’ dental bills were for their 1st 14 years. Anyway, Google “Sugar, The Bitter Truth” to find out how HFCS works in our bodies. And for the “diet” sodas, Google “Dr. Mercola” and type into the search box: “aspartame” Turns out that if soda is stored for 3 months or so in a warm place, the aspartame starts to turn into formaldehyde … not very much but enough to taste bad, give some folks headaches and etc. (even tho the company hastens to assure that this is all in your imagination or you are exaggerating or lying)

    Coke in a green bottle and Passover/kosher Coke don’t have HFCS but still have the 40.5 grams of sugar — sucrose only.

    And the dieticians vs nutritionists is an another example of how a rich corporation inveigled the politicians to pass the laws that allow the corporations to do what they dam well please, regardless of the well being of their customers.

    More and more, we seem to be going back to the ancient “caveat emptor” — “let the buyer beware”. Corporations no longer have customers.. they have buyers. Customers are people the seller takes care of, does well by, cares about. Buyers provide the cash for the seller and nothing else matters.

       0 likes

  28. Angela Sheehan says:

    We the people of America have got to start speaking and standing up for our rights as citizens. We have the right to be told the truth. We have the right to not be exploited from these huge corporations so they can continue to line their pockets with huge sums of money.
    I am calling for unity, to wake up and become intolerant to the many injustices that are plaguing our beloved nation.

       0 likes

  29. Mary says:

    Most dietitians are a joke. They are educated in a way similar to doctors. Only the broad-minded ones that know they are being fed a line actually seek out the truth and expand their horizons. I was going to get the certification, just for the sake of the credential – but my mentor said I would probably shoot myself halfway through the indoctrination process! I’m just getting an N.D. and praying I don’t end up in jail for teaching people to educate themselves!

       0 likes

    • RD says:

      I feel sorry you had such a horrible mentor,

         0 likes

    • gail says:

      You are probably getting a cheap education if you are getting an ND—- which is not a valid nutriton education…. You could probably sign up your dog to get an ND it means nothing.

         1 likes

  30. hRenee says:

    I am in a masters program working towards an RD and I can tell you that we are taught the exact opposite of this in school. RDs get a rigorous medical education, a large part of which is learning about the dangers of sugar based on how it is metabolized and how it effects hormones and disease states, and the guidelines we are taught include statements that, for instance, there is never any reason to give a child sweetened beverages (that includes fruit juice, instead whole fruit should be consumed), etc. We are taught to think critically about these kinds of marketing ploys (mostly we make fun of them) and how to examine the evidence to make informed decisions. In our classes we have plenty of one sided (anti-corporate-sponsorship) discussions about the ADA’s sponsorship policies, and many of us work actively to end sponsorship as members of the ADA.

    Some (not by any means all) in the ADA feel that partnering with food companies will help the companies to make healthier products. You could understand how that could be a persuasive argument for some. Unfortunately this argument fails to take into account the fact that food companies do have a profit motive and association with the ADA provides a golden marketing opportunity. I am glad to hear the sorts of opinions expressed here in this post and in the comments, because it bolsters our argument that sponsorship really does harm our credibility. But please do not assume that RDs on the ground are actually buying any of this marketing foolishness.

       0 likes

    • Esther says:

      hRenee,

      I find what you wrote here to be heartening. I’m glad you were taught about the problems of sugar. Did your course work also talk about the dangers of artificial sweeteners? Or were artificial sweeteners seen as something to recommend to prevent problems from sugar?

      Did you get any learning on GMO foods? Were you taught to look at the issues with them, or taught that they are just about the same as the original foods, no discrimination necessary?

         0 likes

  31. Janeen B. says:

    I saw a dietician (in Colorado) when I was pregnant with gestational diabetes. Instead of recommending living food, organics and homemade foods, she recommended only processed junk, diet soda and anything with a package reading low carb, sugar free, etc. It only made things worse, leading to me taking insulin shots for the last two months of my pregnancy. I’ve since learned a great deal about food and nutrition no thanks to her, and am on a real road to recovery from diabetes. I find it terrifying that these people are giving anyone advice regarding the food that they eat. If I had continued following her advice, my health would be slowly deteriorating even now, and I’d be a permanent consumer of both crappy, fake food and unnecessary further-damaging medications!

       0 likes

  32. GinaV says:

    This is why I did NOT go into the RD program. It’s a political nightmare!

       0 likes

  33. Linda says:

    Corporations like Cocoa Cola will stop at nothing to sell their KNOWINGLY Toxic Soda’s and any other refreshment drinks. The lies are atrocious to say the least. How can a dietician be that gullible? Are they that dumbed down too?

    We need to take down these TOXIC Corporations starting with Monsanto, and working right down the line. Dr. Burzynski beat the FDA, the Texas Medical Board, and a few other Big Conglomerates, we can too there are millions of us!

       0 likes

  34. Marilyn says:

    It would appear that Dieticians would have to study Nutrition in order to gain their license. Evidently, that is not the case? My husband has cancer and the cancer clinic asked if we wanted assistance from a “dietician.” We refused. Had they asked if we wanted assistance from a “Nutriionist, we would have accepted. I searched the web instead for nutrition and have learned a great deal. Coca Cola will be defended because it is a billion dollar industry world-wide. Someone is in bed with the Cola companies. You can bet on that one.

       0 likes

    • Matt Nesral, RD, LN says:

      Oh, it is the case. We study nutrition.

         0 likes

    • Carrie says:

      Are you serious? I’m confused. Literally anyone can call themselves a nutritionist. There is no governing body, no standards, no requirements. To be a dietitian you have to have a 4 year degree, 900+ practicum hours through an internship, and then pass a standardized exam. All dietitians are nutritionists. Not all nutritionists are dietitians. I wouldn’t take advice from a self proclaimed nutritionist if I didn’t know his/her qualifications.

         1 likes

      • MB says:

        Seriously, people? This is ridiculous. As an RD- I cannot believe that we are being blamed for consumer choices. WAKE UP PEOPLE, take some PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY for your health, lifestyle and food choices. And I would like to point out to the holier-than-thou establishment that not all “nutritionist” are qualified to give dietary advice. The reason States are regulating licensure is to PROTECT the public from quacks and misinformation that people like you spread. I recently heard of a VETENARIAN wanting to be called a nutritionist so he could give out nutrition advice. Sorry, but that kind of deception needs to be stopped. I have a Science degree in Nutrition and Dietetics and spent over 900 hours in supervised practice before I started working on my own…I believe I am more qualified to give dietary advice than a Vet. Also, I would like to point out- not all RD’s agree with everything ADA does- specifically as far as sponsorship goes. Making blanket accusations about all RD’s is unfair and unfounded.

        I counsel people everyday about diabetes, weight management, health and wellness and am astonished and frustrated at the lack of care people take of their OWN bodies and how QUICK they are to blame everyone else (the MD who spent 10+ years in school, the RD that spent 4-6+ yrs in school, HFCS, etc). It’s time to quit blaming “the man” or “the government” or “Coke” for your problems. Make your own healthy choices.

           1 likes

        • amberRD says:

          Well Said!!! Amen!! To put a blanket statement out there that all RD’s are promoting junk foods and don’t care about people’s health only about money is prejudice/descrimination at its finest!!!

             1 likes

        • Nutritionista says:

          Just so you know, to be a Nutritionist, you need to have a Master’s Degree (MS) or PhD in Nutrition; unlike an RD, who only needs a BS. These degrees are obtained at such universities as Drexel, West Chester, U of Bridgeport, University of Southern California, Penn State Univ etc. You also have to have 1000 hrs of clinical experience and sit for a 4-hr board examination. You must reapply every 5 yrs for your license and take continuing education classes. Two national accredidation organizations exist. The Credentialing Board for Nutrition Specialists (CNS), started by the American College of Nutrition and the Credentialing Board for Certified Clinical Nutritionists (CCN). Laws vary by state, but the ADA is by no means the only authority on nutrition, nor is it a very credible one, as we can see by the above article. It accepts large donations from food companies to promote unhealthy food selections. While there are certainly good RDs who are smarter than to follow that sort of biased information, the majority of people may be swayed (as can be seen with hospital food, school lunches, cancer and diabetes diets, etc.) I would think people would want to have the best information that’s going to help them get healthy, not some biased lies/stretching of the truth. The ADA needs to seriously re-evaluate itself.

             0 likes

  35. Margaret Johnson says:

    I am more concerned about the asparatime however it is spelled in the diet coke and sodas. I can always tell when it is in a product, as it makes me sick immediately. People just think others are good like them, which makes them gullible, we need to do our homework and research on everything they try to tell us.

       0 likes

  36. J Cook says:

    It is so amazing HOW money talks!!

       0 likes

  37. Charlotte says:

    This is purely a defensive move on the industry’s part. I wonder why any parent would willing give soda to their child when it has no nutrional value at all… and has actual practical uses such as maintainence worker using it to clean roadkill off of roads and mechanic that use it to clean engines and remove engine grease, etc…

    Maybe we need to get soda manufacturers looking at new market applications of soda and get it off the market as a beverage once and for all.

       0 likes

  38. Cheryl says:

    Unbelievable!!!! With the rise in cases of Autism and neurological disorders, I can’t believe doctors will buy into the hype, ESPECIALLY when it comes from the corporations selling the stuff!!!! Doctors are seeing hundreds of thousands more kids streaming into their offices with these disorders. Chemicals in our foods, drugs and in our environment are most certainly responsible and several generations of people affected by these disorders should be proof enough!!

       0 likes

  39. Keith says:

    Perhaps we need to flood Dr. Ronald Kleinman’s email box with respectable and professional clinical studies showing him that there are clinical studies showing the dangers. Most of his recent required “education” has probably been sponsored by the food companies and drug companies as this is often the case. Free medical ceu’s are often sponsored by these self interest organizations.

    This results in a Donkey syndrome (law makers suffer from this too) : If your repeatedly told that your a donkey and have no information to the contrary sooner or later you start to believe you have long ears and a tail. False information becomes accepted as truth. I’m afraid dieticians will soon be afflicted with this also.

       0 likes

  40. elisabeth feerick says:

    What country do we live in anymore? The ultimate “authority” here is the CONSUMER ho must have choices based on our founding democratic philosophy. We should have the choices. I personally would not engage a dietician to advise me, but would listen to a nutritionist – and one who has clinical studies to show me. Misinformation, presented by a “Doctor” who is bribed and whose personal lifestyle depends on the hand that feeds him is just astonishing.

       0 likes

  41. This is a page out of Bernay’s book Propaganda written in 1938. They are still using the same tactics. Spreading disinformation via the opinionmakers and their minions. Using fake authorizations and accredations to indocrinate the indocrinators. It reminds me of something I read in the Bible once to paraphrase: “If a Blind man follows a Blind man, both will fall into the pit”.

       0 likes

  42. Kris says:

    RD’s go through a significant amount of training. Where and who are the PhD nutritionists?? If they have a PhD,what is it in? Someone could have a PhD in philosophy…or art… In the article you say they site studies and there are other studies stating differently…which studies from both sides? references?? By just saying oh we have studies too without giving references doesn’t add credibility to the argument either. Also,clicked on the coca-cola link and it said page not found…For this article, I do not see an author or the author’s credentials listed (unless i am not looking in the right place). Thanks. Follow up info regarding the studies from both sides and correspondence is welcome and encouraged.

       0 likes

  43. One would only have to visit a hospital cafeteria to realize that dietitians have an oddly unhealthy idea of what constitutes a good diet. It’s merely a conventionalist cover for corporate pseudofoods, and it’s a good reason for staying away from hospitals and looking elsewhere for nutritional advice.

       0 likes

    • Carrie says:

      Actually, that is the consumers’ fault. I’m an RD and worked in many cafeterias. Let me tell you, the healthy stuff doesn’t sell. At all. People say they want healthy options…and then buy the fried chicken.

         1 likes

      • RD says:

        I agree with Carrie. We have to start making better choices, not just talking them.

           0 likes

      • Adriene says:

        I’m also an RD, and I have managed several food service operations. I couldn’t agree with Carrie more: people SAY they want healthier options, but then ask for the fries instead of baked potato. It’s frustrating.
        However, hospital staff aren’t our patients.

           1 likes

      • Frustrated RD says:

        I agree about that one. AND the fact that many places may not even hire a dietitian or anyone remotely caring about real nutrition. Our public is so hypoctritical.

           1 likes

  44. Millie says:

    Just wanted to point out that many Registered Dietitians (RD’s) don’t hold to the party line, having seen the studies you have mentioned. Not to mention the fact that common sense says a bunch of chemicals in a glass ain’t health food. There are probably many more RD’s like me who disagree with the ADA than physicians who disagree with the AMA. Just read an RD reviewing the new USDA guidelines (plate) on the stonyfield farms Facebook page- decrying the lack of promotion of organic food.

       0 likes

  45. Jennifer says:

    People are so brainwashed about these food issues. It is nothing more than common sense and remembering what you learned about the human body in “ELEMENTARY” school(basic learning blocks) to give your body proper nutrition. How many more articles and blogs and discussion forums and ill-health reports do people need to read. When you ignore something in life and do not place value on it, it will go away. Value your health and stop purchasing food from companies who DO NOT CARE ABOUT ANYTHING BUT THEIR WEIRD PRODUCT! I have no desire to help someone who sells a product become wealthy on those accounts.

       0 likes

    • Sean says:

      Jennifer,

      In elementary school we learn that almost half of the food we eat should be derived from starchy grains and corn. Do you adhere to this model?

      In my opinion, we need to change what we are teaching in the elementary schools, and then common sense will sky rocket.

      Let’s not forget though, maybe most important in the struggle for a healthier america, our number one export… grains.

         0 likes

      • Jennifer says:

        I agree Sean, I just wanted everyone to remember learning about the systems of the body and how clear it was that our bodies need nutrition. I remember all the info and knowing to this day that cakes, cookies, soda…junk food, was not what my body needed, it just tasted good and i did eat it!
        I believe those, 20 to 30 yrs of age, have what it takes for repentance in these areas. I trust God will download them with strategies to make a difference. Some of you may not care/ agree, that’s ok with me.

           0 likes

      • Mary Sparrowdancer says:

        I’m a medical and health writer, and the late Dr. Luise Light and I often wrote health articles. She was the creator of the true Food Pyramid for the USDA, in which she suggest the diet be based upon fresh fruits and vegetables, NOT starchy grains. But the powerful grain industry had her Pyramid changed from her suggested 2 servings of whole grains a day to 6 to 11 servings a day. She said she and her team were horrified when they saw this – instant recipe for disaster and disease. She became a whistle-blower a few years ago, but there are still not enough people who know the real story.

           0 likes

  46. Wealthy People will do aything to get more lust money. I have cirrhosis of the liver from the frutose in sugar and have no teeth from flouride being in me instead of just a little getting just on the teeth I had.

       0 likes

    • John says:

      Roger, you are mistaken about the fructose in sugar messing up your liver. As long as FIBER, and lots of it are found along with “Nature’s” fructose, you won’t get the same problem as you do with the synthetic form. High fructose corn syrup has NO fiber in it and it is processed by the liver just like alcohol creating the “Fatty liver” or intrahepatic gallstones that do NOT show up on typical scans done of the liver. Since HFCS was introduced, obesity rates have skyrocketed. Fluoride in our water supply is just stupid. My hope is people become educated and the ADA is going to fight hard to protect their paycheck, the food industry & BIG pharma.

      good luck

         0 likes

  47. Jolana Vanek says:

    It made me giggle when I honed in on the name “die-titians” …yep, there is nothing about nutrition in that title ! No wonder their diabetes guidelines are off, that in their book potatoes fit into the same group with dried spaghetti …That last ‘bit’ kept me from signing up for becoming a registered dietetician ! Now I know why…

       0 likes

    • Allyson H says:

      Potatoes and spaghetti aren’t in the same “group.” One is a grain, one is a vegetables, but they both contain carbohydrates (as do fruits, milk, and refined sugars). I don’t know if you are surprised because you think spaghetti or potatoes are bad, but in my professional and personal opinion, neither are.

      Also, the etymology of dietetics means “the study of nutrition as it relates to health.” I guess something you learn if you “sign up” to get a Bachelor’s of Science, complete an often unpaid internship, and pass a national credentialing exam.

         0 likes

  48. Iva says:

    All the American companies care about is the almighty dollar. They couldn’t care less about the health and welfare of the American people. I just hope enough people do care that our country does not go down the drain, it is half way there already…. We all have to come to the conclusion that you are what you eat and if you want to live a long and productive, happy, healthy life, we have got to change our ways. Television does not help, they show people eating their junk and having a wonderful time. I feel you could eat the packaging it comes in and you would be better off…………….

       0 likes

    • Doris says:

      How in all reasonability can the CocaCoca Company be for health and wellness?
      That makes no sense at all. It is surprising dietitians are buying into this! Shame on them!

         0 likes

      • healthsmart says:

        Wow talk about self promotion for uncredentialed and questionable nutritionist. Registered dietitans are the Nutrition experts. If the ADA is proposing a “monopoly on credentials” bravo. This is really an absurd agurment presented, Does the american medical associtation have a monopoly on trainied and monitored medical doctors?
        The american public demands that the health intervention they recieve should be evidence based and reliable the ADA and registered dietians support this. RD’s are knowledgeble enough to determine what research based infomation they will share with their patients.

           0 likes

  49. Tom says:

    I’m really not surprised. The ADA is nothing but an industry mouthpiece. I know from first hand experience. I’m a RN. Dietitians are telling diabetic patients to just eat in moderation and don’t worry about the foods your eating. No need to count carbs, etc. Dietitians who are teaching this should have their license revoked. I have no respect for them for being the junk food industry’s mouthpiece just as I have no respect for physicians because they are the mouthpiece for BigPharma, pushing their poison on an unsuspecting public. Soon I’ll be done with it.

       0 likes

    • Barbara Talbert says:

      I think that as a nurse you have first-hand experience with Big Pharma and deception. Did you know that big companies hire “perception management” firms to make a lie the truth and they are very good at it. Public manipulation is what it is about these days. Please keep up the good fight as we need you who know the truth.

         0 likes

    • Leyanie says:

      Just so you know, RD’s, (who are the most knowledgeable on nutrition) have a new method for diebetics which has been found to be more effective when compared to carb counting. It is called the exchange system. That is the reason they do not have them count carbs. Just because the ADA is supporting this does not mean all dietitians believe it. I am sure most do not buy the fact that coke is safe.

         0 likes

      • Allyson H says:

        I agree, and additionally the carbohydrate exchange system is supported by the American Diabetes Association as well. And this education sponsored by Coke is a joke and embarrassing to both the ADA and dietitians who deal with the backlash from this.

           0 likes

        • Marla RN DC says:

          I have a 10-year-old type II diabetic who was given and “exchange system” die-t with 300 gms carbs per day. There is nothing healthy about that, and it won’t reverse diabetes in that fat kid. The stamp of approval of the American Diabetes Association just goes to show that THEY are not intent upon reversing diabetes, they are a trade organization interested in their own economic interests which includes the perpetuation of diabetes.

             0 likes

      • RD says:

        I am an RD and I don’t buy it.

           0 likes

        • Allyson H says:

          So am I, and I agree. It frustrates me that the ADA could be so focused on the almighty dollar that they don’t consider the implications of this kind of thing.

             0 likes

          • Kari says:

            I agree. What are they thinking when they agree to this sort of thing? It’s an embarrassment to our profession. I’m an RD and I don’t buy it. I purposely do not participate in any continuing ed activity that is sponsored by a major food company.

               0 likes

    • Sean says:

      Tom,

      What are your thoughts on drugless, alternative approaches to patient care like chiropractic, acupuncture, physical therapy?

         0 likes

    • LeAnn Craddock says:

      I don’t agree with a lot of the medical profession but you said it sister!

         0 likes

  50. I can only say that government should wake up and STOP THE INSANITY

       0 likes

    • Elle says:

      So sad! Really absurd.

         0 likes

    • Dave says:

      Our government is the problem. Let’s not believe for one second that our government has any of interests at heart. There are politicians that we elected that are making money from these shady deals. Corruption at its finest. When will the people wake up? Pretty soon some crooked doctor will tell us that crack is healthy and should be smoked daily. Just like the old cigarette ads. Doctors choose x-brand crack and so should you…

         0 likes

      • DyeDiet says:

        Exactly so, Dave!

        It is surprising to me that some people still see the government as a nanny… Not the government should wake up – they ARE awake – WE NEED to grow up!!! We, the people, only can stop the chemical invasion ito our and our children’s lives. The big other side of PROBLEM is that WE, the consumers, KEEP buying
        artificially COLORED fake food products! The reason is – IGNORANCE and reckless about the future.

        I am a professional pharmaceutical chemist who cannot be silent any longer about
        what is going on in the US food industry. I just started a website DyeDiet.com
        where I do my best to help the consumer to avoid what I call food with biologically
        foreign additives, including the food dyes, of course. The Dye Diet is the list I ccan do from my side.

        Nick

           0 likes

        • Jane says:

          I am a Registered Dietitan – We were told that there is no evidence proving GMO foods are linked to health problems. We were told that organic foods are no different then non organic foods with regard to nutrient content not pesticide content. We were never told about the endocrine disruptors in pesticides and how GMO foods cause 100% sterilization in the 3 generation of rats or that thousands of Indian farmers are committing suicide due to failed GM crops. We were told that washing the vegetable worked but in reality the pesticides actually soak up in to cells of the plants making it impossible to wash off. I felt robbed my dietetics education. The ADA is sponsored by multinational companies. This is why the ADA does fund any independent research grants directed towards GM food risks or the dangers of pesticides unless of course the results are pro GM foods. Don t believe me? Why dont you take a tour through one of our global conferences http://www.vimeo.com/59828051

             0 likes

    • . Jim foster says:

      The new age of the robber baron and unmitigated corruption.

         0 likes

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